Best Hunting Boots For Men | 2022-23

What Are The Best Hunting Boots For Men?

We’ve done the research and put together a list of the best men’s hunting boots of the year, whether you want to hunt moose in the Yukon or just need a good pair of boots for your weekly duck hunt.

The kind of beast that hunting boots are is unique. If your boots can’t handle the weather, chances are you won’t be able to either.

Aside from being tough and resistant to the weather, the best hunting boots all have their own special features. Most of the time, a good fit depends on the person wearing the shoe and the size of their feet. Some boots do stand out from the rest, though, so we’ve put together a list of different options to help you choose.

When we wanted to find the best of the best, we looked into what hunters wear for different kinds of hunting. Finding the best hunting boots for your type of hunting can make the difference between having a great day in the field and having to walk back to the truck without anything because your feet hurt.

From the best early season elk hunting boots to the warmest best tree stand hunting boots, this list is sure to have something that will work.

If you know what you want, click on one of the links below. If not, keep scrolling to see a list of the best in each category. Check out our full buyer’s guide if you don’t know where to start.

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Best Cold Weather Hunting Boots

Category:Boot:
Best Overall Hunting Boot
Best Budget Hunting Boot
Best Elk Hunting Boot
Best Non-Insulated Hunting Boot
Best Hunting Boot for Foot & Ankle Problems
Best Upland Hunting Boot
Best Rubber Hunting Boot
Best Treestand Hunting Boot
Most Versatile Hunting Boots
Crispi Nevada GTX
LaCrosse Atlas
Kenetrek Mountain Extreme 400g
Schnee’s Beartooth 0g
Kenetrek Overstep Orthopedic Boot
Irish Setter Wingshooter 9″
XTRATUF Legacy 15″
Muck Arctic Pro
Danner Recurve

Notable Mentions

Boots:
Lowa Renegade II N GTX Hi TF
Le Chameau Lite Stalking Boot
Danner Pronghorn
Crispi Colorado GTX
Best Overall
best hunting boots crispi nevada gtx

Crispi Nevada GTX

  • Height: 8″
  • Weight: 1.9 lbs per boot (size 10)
  • Insulation: Uninsulated or 200g
  • Upper Material: Nubuck Leather

Our Verdict

The reviews are in, and the “best overall” spot for 2022 goes to the $399–$429 Crispi Nevada GTX. The Nevada GTX has been a favorite among hunters for a long time. It comes in both uninsulated and insulated (200g) versions.

Hunters with ankles that tend to roll say that the ankle bone support structure (ABSS) is the best, and reviewers keep saying that this boot is “comfortable right out of the box.”

There is some give in these boots, which makes them great for hiking, backpacking, spending long days on your feet, and hitting the trail with a pack full of meat. The fact that these boots can be resoled is a huge plus. This means that once you buy them, they’re yours for as long as you take good care of them.

For the price of two pairs of mid-level hunting boots, this investment will save you money in the long run. We chose these boots as the best hunting boots of 2022 because they are comfortable, sturdy, weatherproof, and long-lasting.

Best Budget Hunting Boot: LaCrosse Atlas

LaCrosse Men's Atlas 8" Hunting Boot

Since 1897, LaCr osse has been making hunting boots, and the quality shows. Reviewers love the affordable Atlas, which costs between $210 and $240 and comes in four versions, ranging from not insulated to having 1,200 g of insulation.

These boots are lighter than most heavy-duty boots, which makes them perfect for long days when comfort is a priority. The toe and heel caps are also molded, which protects the boots in places where they are likely to be hit.

The outsole is praised a lot in reviews, and the general consensus is that it doesn’t freeze, has good grip and traction, and can be used on a variety of surfaces. With the Dry-Core waterproof lining, these boots are quite versatile for their low price.

LaCrosse Men's Atlas 8" Hunting Boot

At just $240 for the fully insulated version, the Atlas meets a lot of requirements for a top hunting boot, but it won’t break the bank. Depending on how they’re used, though, they probably won’t last as long as more expensive options.

Specs:

  • Height: 8″
  • Weight: 3.3 lbs (avg per pair)
  • Insulation: Four options (uninsulated to 1,200g)
  • Upper Material: Nubuck Leather

Best Elk Hunting Boot: 
Kenetrek Mountain Extreme 400g

This specialized boot from Kenetrek was not made for long-distance hiking. This is a stiff boot made for side-hilling steep terrain. It gives your ankles a lot of support while descending talus and other technical terrain, and it gives you a lot of relief when things get rough.

The Mountain Extreme ($500–$540) is a boot made for hunting elk, sheep, or mountain goats in high alpine areas. It’s made to give you support and keep your feet dry and warm while you hunt.

The 10″ height keeps water and dirt out, and the custom K-Talon outsole gives you confidence on a wide range of tough surfaces. Waterproofing made with Windtex works well in mud, snow, ice, and rain. A guard is added to the sole to make it stronger and last longer.

The Mountain Extreme is great for big hunts in the wildest places, but most hunters don’t need it. Kenetrek’s Mountain Extreme may be the best hunting boot for you, though, if you climb mountains often in rough weather and need a lot of foot protection and support during really epic hunts.

Specs:

  • Height: 10″
  • Weight: 4.2 lbs (avg per pair)
  • Insulation: 400g Thinsulate
  • Upper Material: Leather

Best Non-Insulated Hunting Boot: 
Schnee’s Beartooth 0g

Snow’s boots are a favorite in the northern Rockies. They were made with Montana in mind. From spring to fall, these boots are often worn by guides and hunters alike.

The Beartooth ($469) has just enough stiffness for mountain trips and enough comfort for a long hike in the summer. Reviewers love how it lets air in, lasts long, and can be worn in different ways. If you need a little more warmth, they also come in a 200g insulated version.

The 9-inch upper is good for rough terrain, but the Flex-2 chassis makes them very flexible. Schnee sells these boots as “shoulder season to summer do-it-all boots” that are good for both casual walks in the woods and steep climbing on uneven terrain.

They aren’t all-season boots because they don’t have insulation, but if you’re going on a long trip in mild weather, you’ll be glad for the extra comfort and breathability. We’re pretty sure that these are the best hunting boots that don’t have insulation that money can buy.

Specs:

  • Height: 8″
  • Weight: 3.9 lbs per pair (size 10)
  • Insulation: Uninsulated
  • Upper Material: 2.3mm Top Grain Leather

Best Hunting Boot for Foot & Ankle Problems: 
Kenetrek Overstep Orthopedic Boot

Kenetrek Everstep Orthopedic Boots

The Overstep ($625) is the most expensive boot on our list, but it is also the only AFI-classified boot that can be prescribed to help offset the cost if you have difficult foot or ankle problems.

These boots have everything you need in a good pair of hunting boots: waterproof Windtex, 2.8mm full-grain leather uppers, a 10′′ height, and a very durable K-Talon outsole. Your feet and ankles don’t have to work as hard because of an extra brace system and a 19-degree toe rocker. This lets you move around with less pain and stress.

This boot helps active military members and veterans stay on their feet in the field, and hunters with ankle problems say it has helped them keep hunting when they wouldn’t have been able to before. Quite a summary.

Try the Overstep if you have trouble with your ankles or just want more stability to avoid injuries.

Specs:

  • Height: 10″
  • Weight: 4.8 lbs (avg per pair)
  • Insulation: Uninsulated
  • Upper Material: 2.8mm Full Grain Leather

Best Upland Hunting Boot: 
Irish Setter Wingshooter 9″


Irish Setter Wingshooter 9

The $135–$330 Irish Setter Wingshooter line has been a favorite of upland hunters of all kinds for a long time. The classic look of the boot makes it stylish enough for a trip to the city, but it was made to be worn on the prairie, not on concrete.

The 9-inch height keeps grass and gravel from getting into the boot, and the waterproof outside keeps feet dry in all kinds of weather. It also comes in a 400g insulated version for people who hunt birds in harsher conditions.


Irish Setter Wingshooter 9




Because of their classic look, these boots are great for wearing all day, from the farm to the brewery and back again. These are the best hunting boots for the outdoorsman who cares about style. They have a tried-and-true design and can be insulated for cold weather if needed.

Specs:

  • Height: 9″
  • Weight: 2 lbs per boot (avg)
  • Insulation: Two options (uninsulated to 400g)
  • Upper Material: Leather

Best Rubber Hunting Boot:
XTRATUF Legacy 15″

XTRATUF Legacy 15″

People in the Lower 48 sometimes forget about XTRATUFs ($140), which are also called “Alaska slippers.” But these comfortable, durable, and mud-resistant boots can handle almost anything your day throws at them.

Designed for fishermen, the non-slip sole is a lifesaver in slippery conditions, and the triple-dipped shell is light, flexible, and resistant to rust. Reviews say that some pairs have lasted as long as 20 years. I agree with them. Even though my XTRATUFs are only 2 years old and have been through a lot in the field, they look as good as new.

XTRATUF Legacy 15″

As an added bonus, this is one of the best winter boots for walking around town or in the field when it’s wet. These aren’t the best boots for long hikes, but they are great if you hunt in wet places and want to be ready for anything when you get out of the truck.

Specs:

  • Height: 15″
  • Weight: 4 lbs (avg per pair)
  • Insulation: Uninsulated (open cell foam and Neoprene retain heat well)
  • Upper Material: Triple Dipped Latex Neoprene 

Most Versatile Hunting Boots:
Danner Recurve

After two years and hundreds of miles of hunting, our test pair; (photo by Sean McCoy).

Can everything be done with one pair of hunting boots? No. But the Danner Recurve got us through two busy hunting seasons of elk, waterfowl, deer, and upland bird hunting in the Rocky Mountains and on the brushy plains of South Dakota. And our tester never felt like he needed something else.

The Danner Recurve, which costs between $240 and $250, is on the lighter end of hunting boots. It weighs about 1.9 pounds per boot, or 45 ounces per pair. It has a 7-inch height and a sole that is pretty flexible. The ankle support is average. They use a membrane called “Danner Dry” that keeps water out but lets air in. It works pretty well. This means that the boot is comfortable right out of the box. And from what we learned, that comfort lasted for hundreds of miles of hard experience.

The Danner Recurve comes in both insulated and uninsulated versions. We put the uninsulated boot to the test, and it tested well from temperatures in the low 60s down to the teens. If it were any colder, you’d need boots with insulation. If it gets any hotter, any full-grain leather boot will get hot.

The Recurve is like a mid-weight hiking boot in a lot of ways. Its softer sole is nice on long days with a lot of miles, but it doesn’t offer the support or protection of stiffer, heavier boots. If you’re a lighter hunter who prefers lighter boots with less support, this one should be at the top of your list if you’re going to cover a lot of miles. Check our complete review.

Specs:

  • Height: 7″
  • Weight: 3 lbs (avg per pair)
  • Insulation: Uninsulated to 400g
  • Upper Material: Leather

Best Treestand Hunting Boot:
Muck Arctic Pro

Best Treestand Hunting Boot: Muck Arctic Pro
Best Treestand Hunting Boot: Muck Arctic Pro

Muck’s Arctic Pro line, which costs $195, is designed to keep your feet and legs comfortable in temperatures as low as -60 degrees F. The 8mm neoprene booty wraps around your foot and calf to keep heat in, and the durable outsole has a good grip for shorter hikes.

The fleece lining makes these boots comfortable to wear in cold weather, and the 2mm of thermal foam under the foot not only helps keep heat in but also gives them a soft feel that you don’t get in a lot of hunting boots. Overall, these are great for situations where you can’t move much and need to stay still to keep your body heat.

It’s important to remember that if the boot is too tight, it won’t keep the heat in as well. Make sure there is some room in the Arctic Pro, and sometimes a lighter sock will keep your foot warmer. This is true for both Muck boots and other rubber boots.

Specs:

  • Height: 17″
  • Weight: 2.25 lbs (avg per boot)
  • Insulation: Fleece Lined, 2mm Thermal Footbed
  • Upper Material: 8mm Neoprene

Notable Mentions

Lowa Renegade II N GTX Hi TF

Lowa Renegade II N GTX Hi TF

The Lowa Renegade II N GTX Hi TF ($295) is a great combination of a hiking boot and a hunting boot. If you want a step up from your usual hiking boots, this rugged boot is light enough and strong enough to do the job.

This 8-inch version of the popular Renegade fits the needs of hunters a bit better than the mid version, but it still has a lot of the things we love about the original. The outsole of the Lowa Patrol is very tough, and the Gore-Tex liner keeps water out. These boots are ready for anything because they are made of Nubuck leather.

This three-season boot is very comfortable, can cover a lot of ground, doesn’t take too long to break in, and will last for a long time. These boots are great for hunting, hiking, and exploring. They can also be used for a variety of different tasks.

Specs:

  • Height: 8″
  • Weight: 1.4 lbs (avg per boot)
  • Insulation: Uninsulated
  • Upper Material: Nubuck Leather

Le Chameau Lite Stalking Boot

Le Chameau Lite Stalking Boot
Le Chameau Lite Stalking Boot

Certainly. Le Chameau, which sells boots for $399, has been making hunting boots for the French mountains for almost 100 years. The brand has gotten pretty good at it, and the “lite” part isn’t a joke. The Stalking Boots cost $399 and weigh 3.3 pounds per pair. This is much lighter than most mountain boots.

Michelin made the Deep Forest sole with motocross tires in mind. It is both flexible and has a good grip. Le Chameau says that these boots run small and that you should order one size up for a good fit. The Stalking Boots have all the features you’d expect from the best hunting boots, plus a five-layer LCX lining that keeps water out and does a surprisingly good job of letting vapor escape.

We put these to the test in rough conditions while backpacking to Colorado to hunt elk. We wore them for weeks and went on several hunts. They held up well and kept our feet happy. If you care most about keeping the weight down, these are some of the best hunting boots you can find.

Specs:

  • Height: 10″
  • Weight: 3.3 lbs (avg per pair)
  • Insulation: Uninsulated
  • Upper Material: Terracare Full Grain Leather

Crispi Colorado GTX

Crispi Colorado GTX

Crispi’s Colorado GTX, which costs $350, is just as good as its Nevada cousin and costs a little less. It is a stiffer, mountain-eating, warmer-weather boot.

It has Vibram soles that grip well and a tough exterior, making it a good boot for a mountain trip. It’s waterproof all over, so it can handle a lot. Even though they are stiff, they don’t take too long to break in.

The ABSS (ankle bone support system) makes the boot feel stable, so it’s a good choice for long-distance hiking for people whose ankles tend to give out when they turn and twist.

Specs:

  • Height: 8″
  • Weight: 1.7 lbs (avg per boot)
  • Insulation: Uninsulated
  • Upper Material: Suede and Cordura

Danner Pronghorn

danner progner
danner progner

The Pronghorn, which costs between $230 and $300, might not be the best boot for late-season high-alpine hunting, but it can do just about anything else. It’s a comfortable, well-cushioned boot designed on Danner’s Terra Force Next platform, which is made for stability on rough terrain.

This is one of the boots on this list that fits more like a tennis shoe and has a bit more support. Still, it’s not a very stiff boot, so it wouldn’t help much on steep slopes or in mountains.

A Vibram SPE midsole gives support without losing flexibility, and a Vibram Pronghorn outsole gives traction on a wide range of surfaces. It’s a good deal for an all-around hunting boot. And there are options that keep the heat in.

Specs:

  • Height: 8″
  • Weight: 3.3 lbs (avg per pair)
  • Insulation: Uninsulated to 1200g
  • Upper Material: Full Grain Leather and Nylon

How to Choose the Right Hunting Boot: A Buyer’s Guide

How you hunt will determine which boots are the best for you. If you are hunting waterfowl in the South from a marsh blind, you probably won’t wear a pair of insulated Kenetrek boots. Upland hunting in a place where rattlesnakes live? Snake boots might be something you have to wear.

Which boot you pull on will depend on the weather, the terrain, and the challenges of the habitat. Here are some things that can help you find the best boot for your foot. Check out our 20 tips for buying the right boot if you want more information.

Know Your Size and How Your Boots Fit

Remember those strange metal things that you’d step into to get your size? Still, they are useful tools. As we get older, our feet can change and grow. Getting accurate measurements at your local REI or sporting goods store can help you find the right pair.

You might wear a 9 in one brand and a 10 in another, or you might need a narrow or wide size. Be willing to try things that aren’t your size.

If you plan to wear your new boots for long periods of time, your feet might swell. Try on boots toward the end of the day, when your feet are likely to be bigger.

If a boot feels tight all over, you might want to go up a half size. And if they hurt your toes on day one, you don’t want to wear them on day two.

Remember This

Don’t try on boots while wearing socks you wouldn’t wear hunting. If you’re looking for a boot to get you through a late-season elk hunt, look for one with good insulation and waterproofing.

If you’re looking for an early-season archery boot, put on your light hiking socks and make sure they’re breathable. The most important thing is to avoid getting blisters from hot spots. Before you go into the woods, you’ll want to make sure your system works.

Is it still not quite right? Finding an insole you like can also help you get the right fit. Superfeet is a popular brand, and it has a wide range of insoles to suit different needs. You can also try out different ways to tie your laces to get the perfect fit.

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